RODEO

Quincy Eldridge wows the Western world of fashion.

QUINCY

By Ken Amorosano

A LOT OF MY DESIGNS TRACE BACK TO VINTAGE VAQUERO AND STUFF THAT MY GRANDFATHER WOULD WEAR BACK IN THE EARLY ’50S AND ’60s.

~ Quincy Freeman Eldridge

ADOLFO

Her great-great-grandfather, Adolfo Camarillo was the “Last Spanish Don” of the region’s pre-1848 Spanish settlers, for whom this California coastal town is name

IT ALL RELATES BACK TO HER FAMILY'S HISTORY

Quincy’s grandmother Rosita grew up riding her family’s majestic horses in the Spanish Vaquero tradition, making yearly appearances in the Tournament of Roses Parade. 

ROSITA

RAISED ON HORSEBACK

Her mother Sally trained cutting horses, often telling how she rode while she was pregnant with her.

CREATIVE SIDE

Quincy began tinkering with her creative side, hand-painting her creative designs on the belts, boots, and tack she wore during rodeo competition.

QUINCY

RODEO QUINCY

Upon graduating college, she launched Rodeo Quincy and began her professional journey.

TAKING THE SHOW ON THE ROAD

Quincy made a big splash at rodeos where her elaborate retail booth became a center point for cowgirl fashionistas.

DIGITAL DARLING

Rodeo Quincy has built an online audience of tens of thousands of followers.

The line encompasses designs ranging from colorfully embroidered boots and flirty fringed belts, to sassy tops, scarves, hats, and jewelry, and can be found in more than 300 retail stores nationwide.